Mercutio s motivation

But it helps us get an idea of just how flashy Mercutio is.

mercutio personality

Mercutio seems to exist outside the two dominant spheres of Verona because he takes neither the world of love nor the feud seriously.

Just take his entry into the play. On the other hand, maybe it doesn't make much sense to apply 21st century categories of sexual desire to a 16th century play. In contrast to Mercutio, Benvolio wants to avoid confrontation.

Is mercutio a montague

Mercutio, unlike Romeo, doesn't believe that dreams can act as portents. Prick love for pricking, and you beat love down. Shakespeare presents the usually quick-tempered Tybalt as capable of both sensible and honourable behaviour: characteristics we rarely associate with him. He advocates an adversarial concept of love that contrasts sharply with Romeo's idealized notion of romantic union. He's also pretty hostile toward women and female sexuality in general. One thing is certain: Shakespeare's work is full of men who value male friendship and comradery over male-female relationships. How does Shakespeare present Tybalt here and in the rest of the play? Take his Queen Mab speech, which starts off as a bizarre rant about the mythological fairy Queen Mab and ends up talking about of course sex: This is that very Mab that plats the manes of horses in the night And bakes the elflocks in foul sluttish hairs, Which once untangled, much misfortune bodes. On the other hand, maybe it doesn't make much sense to apply 21st century categories of sexual desire to a 16th century play. Shakespeare portrays him as a go-between from the start. Shakespeare shows him deliberately placing the potential blame elsewhere to avoid incensing the unpredictable Mercutio.

Interestingly, Shakespeare presents Tybalt as uncharacteristically wary in this scene. In other words—the best way to cure a broken heart is to have sex.

Prick love for pricking, and you beat love down. So he scornfully asks: "And is he such a man to encounter Tybalt?

Mercutio internal conflict

His death marks a distinct turning point in the play as tragedy begins to overwhelm comedy, and the fates of the protagonists darken. So he scornfully asks: "And is he such a man to encounter Tybalt? Take his Queen Mab speech, which starts off as a bizarre rant about the mythological fairy Queen Mab and ends up talking about of course sex: This is that very Mab that plats the manes of horses in the night And bakes the elflocks in foul sluttish hairs, Which once untangled, much misfortune bodes. This is the had, when maids lie on their backs, That presses them and learns them first to bear, Making them women of good carriage. In fact, English poet John Dryden said that Shakespeare himself admitted that he had to kill Mercutio—or else, he said, Mercutio would have killed him. Just take his entry into the play. Interestingly, Shakespeare presents Tybalt as uncharacteristically wary in this scene. The take-home point, we think, is that for Mercutio, sex is always a little gross and dirty—and always a little crazy.

Here, Mercutio says that women who are "hag-ridden" by Queen Mab are just learning how to "bear"—i. That turns out to be a mistake on his part: Tybalt kills him in Act 3, Scene 1.

Tybalt character analysis essay

Mercutio demonstrates his loyalty and courage when he takes up Tybalt's challenge to defend his friend's name. So he scornfully asks: "And is he such a man to encounter Tybalt? The take-home point, we think, is that for Mercutio, sex is always a little gross and dirty—and always a little crazy. Interestingly, Shakespeare presents Tybalt as uncharacteristically wary in this scene. These qualities are explored further in Act 3, Scene 1. This symbolises the connection and affection between them. He's dirty, funny, out of control, and—we'll say it—compared to him, Romeo and Juliet can seem whiny and repetitive. Probably not. The clearest example of this is when he lists Rosaline's body parts in a crude monologue that makes fun of Romeo and a popular poetic convention the " blazon ," a poetic technique that catalogues a woman's body parts and compares them to things in nature : I must conjure him. Shakespeare presents the usually quick-tempered Tybalt as capable of both sensible and honourable behaviour: characteristics we rarely associate with him. Mercutio and Love It's not surprising that, with this attitude toward love and sex, Mercutio comes across as opposed to the whole idea of love between a man and a woman.

He advocates an adversarial concept of love that contrasts sharply with Romeo's idealized notion of romantic union. When Mercutio hears of Tybalt's challenge to Romeo, he is amused because he regards Romeo as a lover whose experience of conflict is limited to the world of love.

He's dirty, funny, out of control, and—we'll say it—compared to him, Romeo and Juliet can seem whiny and repetitive.

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Character analysis: Benvolio, Mercutio and Tybalt in Romeo and Juliet